March 2015

Thanks for checking out the March issue of RespecText!

Tools for Teens

News Bits

  • We were so excited last month when our partner, Mary Kay, confirmed actress/singer Debby Ryan as their newest cause champion! Known for her starring role as TV’s “Jessie,” Ms. Ryan will travel the country to help educate teens and young adults on healthy relationships and how to recognize the signs of dating abuse. She will serve as the spokesperson for Mary Kay’s Don’t Look Away campaign to help prevent and end dating abuse.
  • Don’t forget that April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Learn more about ways to get involved!

Advocate’s Corner

Cyberbullying and digital abuse can affect anyone with an online presence. Just recently, actress Ashley Judd made headlines when one of her tweets elicited some pretty vulgar and threatening responses. A similar thing happened to former pro-baseball player Curt Schilling when he tweeted about his teenage daughter being accepted to college. You can read more about that situation on his blog (warning: he references some tweets with graphic language).

As Schilling notes in his blog post, it’s all too easy to hide behind a computer screen and believe you won’t face real-life consequences for what you do online. However, he was able to track down a few of the worst offenders, who were fired or suspended for their actions. Judd has filed police reports and is considering taking legal action against the perpetrators of the abusive tweets aimed at her. On a related note, earlier this year on an episode of This American Life, writer Lindy West had a rather enlightening phone conversation with someone who trolled her online.

Many people question whether or not to take online threats and bullying seriously, but we know that digital abuse can affect victims emotionally and psychologically. In light of all this, it’s more important than ever to talk to young people about using the internet safely and respectfully. Point out the real people who are affected by digital abuse, and how everyone has the power to stop, think and choose not to be abusive, online or off.

Related Resources:
Twitter does have a forum for reporting abuse and threats, but they direct users to contact their local law enforcement if they feel they are in danger.

Powerful Resources

Learn more about issues facing teens and tweens from Futures Without Violence.

If you or a teen you know has questions about dating abuse, loveisrespect advocates are available to help 24/7. Chat at loveisrespect.org, text loveis to 22522, or call 1-866-331-9474. 

February 2015

The February edition of RespecText is full of information and updates about Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month (Teen DV Month)!

Tools for Teens

In honor of Teen DV Month, we hope you’ll encourage teens to explore loveisrespect.org and take our quizzes:

News Bits

Throughout Teen DV Month, loveisrespect has been discussing different topics related to dating abuse and relationships. Each week we’ve focused on a theme and linked to related content on our website. On Feb. 12 we hosted a Twitter chat about relationship rights with our friends Break the Cycle and Casa de Esperanza – read the highlights on Storify! We’ve also been posing questions to our social networks using the #LIRasks hashtag. It’s been a busy month! Check out the links below:

Advocate’s Corner

From Kirsten Sorensen, Digital Services Manager at loveisrespect

All of us at loveisrespect would like to commend the students in Alpine, TX who used Teen DV Month as an opportunity to bring the conversation about dating abuse home to their community. The message was loud and clear: “Not only is dating abuse a problem, it is a problem that is happening here in our town, and it is up to us to stop it.”

Student leaders from Alpine High School and Sul Ross State University worked in partnership to make Respect Week 2015 a memorable one by promoting conversations in their respective schools. There were class presentations, a movie night and a big Orange-Out celebration where students could have their faces painted while creating posters proclaiming what love and respect mean to them. All of these activities were entirely organized and led by the students! The conversation caught on as local businesses such as Plaine Coffee agreed to hand out customized sleeves with their coffee, inviting their patrons to join the conversation at #SRSURespectWeek.

The week culminated with the Let’s Talk! Panel Event, a panel discussion at Sul Ross State University that consisted of students, survivors, professors and local experts – and loveisrespect was there, too! The hour-and-a-half-long event was a profound ending to a week full of dialogue as student audience members engaged the panel with their stories and questions. The discussion was primarily carried by the audience, who not only weighed in on what dating violence looks like and means for their generation, but challenged each other’s assumptions and connected by telling stories about their shared experiences. We at loveisrespect were thrilled to be part of this conversation, and we’re thankful to Alpine students for setting a national example with their dedication and involvement.

abigail, ryan, megan, courtney love is  drink sleeves at Plaine Coffee

Powerful Resources

Trans Lifeline is a non-profit dedicated to the well-being of transgender people. Their free hotline is staffed by transgender people, for transgender people. The hotline is primarily for transgender people experiencing a crisis, which includes people who may be struggling with their gender identity and/or are not sure that they are transgender. This is an especially wonderful resource in light of the recent tragic suicides of young transgender people, including Leelah Alcorn.

Need additional resources? Our Technical Assistance chat for parents and teachers occurs the first Wednesday of every month from 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Central. Go to this page and click on the chat button next to “Are you a teacher or parent?” when activated. 

January 2015

Happy 2015, and welcome to the first RespecText of the year!

We’re so glad to have your support. If you know a friend, family member or colleague who would find RespecText useful, please share the subscription info: just text “updateme” to 22522!

Tools for Teens

News Bits

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month! Follow loveisrespect on Twitter and Facebook for Teen DV Month updates, and be sure to check out our blog throughout the month. Teens can download our toolkit for Respect Week (Feb. 9-13) for cool ideas on how to raise awareness in their schools and communities.

Advocate’s Corner

A recent study by researchers at the University of North Dakota claims that one in three heterosexual college men admit they might rape a woman (in other words, force a woman to have sex) if no one found out and they wouldn’t face any consequences. The researchers acknowledge that this study was very preliminary and based on a small sample, but it highlights some interesting perspectives that perpetuate rape culture and sexual assault. When researchers actually used the word “rape” in their questions, the number of men who said they would force a woman to have sex dropped. This suggests that some college men don’t associate the act of forcing a woman to have sex with the crime of committing rape. The study also measured the respondents’ attitudes about women, which tended to affect the men’s answers. You can read the full study here.

At loveisrespect, we believe educating young people of all genders about healthy dating and sexual behaviors is incredibly important. Having conversations about consent, understanding sexual coercion, and emphasizing the fact that no one has the “right” to anyone else’s body or affections can help prevent unhealthy attitudes from forming and, hopefully, reduce the number of sexual assaults occurring on campuses and elsewhere.

Powerful Resources

As we get ready for Teen DV Month in February, check out the National Online Resource Center on Violence Against Women’s Special Collection on Preventing and Responding to Teen Dating Violence.

Remember, loveisrespect advocates are available 24/7/365! Call us at 1-866-331-9474, chat online at www.loveisrespect.org, or text loveis to 22522.

December 2014

Welcome to the final RespecText of 2014!

We appreciate your continued support and hope you’ll share RespecText with colleagues, friends and family.

Happy holidays, and here’s to more healthy relationships in the new year!

Tools for Teens

News Bits

  • In early December the loveisrespect team attended a Healthy Relationships Rally at Creekview High School in Carrollton, TX. Friends from Mary Kay and Verizon, as well as Texas Senator Jane Nelson, joined us to talk to students about healthy relationships and digital abuse.
  • Loveisrespect recently participated in the #JustAsk Twitter chat hosted by MTV’s It’s Your Sex Life. Other guests included YouTube star and sex-positive activist Laci Green and Bedsider.org. We chatted about healthy relationships and answered questions from participants about dating. Check out Storify for highlights from the chat!

Advocate’s Corner

Yik Yak is a popular app among teens that allows users to post messages anonymously, much like Secret and Whisper. The difference between Yik Yak and other apps is that it limits anonymous postings to a small, local radius, which makes it attractive to high school and college students. It’s been at the center of controversy lately after being linked to bullying and used as a forum for sexually explicit messages.

In a recent interview, the app’s founders claim that they are now creating geo-fences around middle and high schools that block those students from accessing the app (while at school, anyway), and instead they are targeting college campuses. They also claim that they are taking steps to reduce and remove posts that are offensive, threatening, bullying, and abusive.

It’s important to be aware of the apps and sites that teens are frequently using, and we always encourage having open conversations about online safety and respectful online behavior. Read more about social networking safety, and talk to the teens in your life about their experiences both online and off!

Powerful Resources

The NW Network of Bisexual, Trans, Lesbian and Gay Survivors of Abuse “works to end violence and abuse by building loving and equitable relationships in our community and across the country.” Their guide “It Takes a Village, People!” (PDF) offers information and guidance for advocates, friends and family members on responding and providing support to LGBT survivors.

 

Remember, loveisrespect advocates are available 24/7/365!  Call us at 1-866-331-9474, chat online at www.loveisrespect.org, or text loveis to 22522.

November 2014

Hello! Thank you for checking out the November issue of RespecText.

Do you know a parent, teacher, or school counselor who would love to have RespecText delivered to their smartphone each month? Help us spread the word and let them know they can text “updateme” to 22522 to subscribe.

All of us at loveisrespect wish you a Happy Thanksgiving!

Tools for Teens

News Bits

  • On October 28th, we participated in the #FVPSAyouth Twitter Town Hall hosted by VAWnet. To celebrate Domestic Violence Awareness Month and the 30th anniversary of the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA), this discussion centered around the importance of young voices in the movement to end domestic and dating violence and available resources for youth leaders. Check out the Town Hall on Storify, or watch this video to learn more about FVPSA.
  • Eminem is no stranger to controversy, but he crossed a line when he recently rapped that he’ll “punch Lana Del Rey in the face twice like Ray Rice.” Some may brush this off as harmless, but we know that words can cause plenty of damage. Not only do many people experience verbal abuse in their relationships, but the use of violence and abusive lyrics in popular music perpetuates a culture that accepts violence and abuse. Talk to your teen about the music they listen to regularly. What are the lyrics really saying? How does your teen feel about these messages?

Advocate’s Corner

We wanted to share this great video created by the teens at Community Healthcare Network’s Teens P.A.C.T. program in New York City. This is just one in a series of public service announcements collectively titled More Than Just Sex. More Than Just Sex aims to empower young people to make positive decisions, create social change, and reduce the rates of teen pregnancy, STD’s, and HIV in New York City and beyond.

We like the video because it shows how abuse can take many forms and often escalates within an abusive relationship. It’s so important to recognize the warning signs and emphasize to teens what love looks like: it is not controlling, it is not fearful, it is not jealous. Share this video with a teen in your life!

Powerful Resources

The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) teamed up with Facebook to create Safety & Privacy on Facebook: A Guide for Survivors of Abuse. They have released this guide in several languages, and you can download it for free from NNEDV’s website.

October 2014

Hello, and thanks for checking out the October issue of RespecText!

Lots of goodies this month, so let’s get to it.

Tools for Teens

News Bits

  • You may be aware of the ongoing sexual abuse and harassment allegations involving several popular YouTube users. The most recent is Sam Pepper, who uploaded a video of what he deemed a “social experiment” in which he touched women on the street, presumably without their consent. Sex education activist and YouTube star Laci Green protested the video for promoting sexual harassment, which started a firestorm of protest from other users. YouTube has since removed Pepper’s video, but these issues are ongoing. You can read more about YouTube sexual abuse issues dating back to 2012 here. As we’ve said before, while social media provides copious outlets for positive expression and connection, it can also be used to abuse, harass, and shame. Fortunately, several users in the YouTube community have formed the YouCoalition, which is attempting to organize a large-scale response to these issues. While promoting a Safer Community Pledge and the “Healthy YouTube” tag, this group is teaming up with other online leaders to encourage change and discussion and discourage abuse or unhealthy behaviors.
  • Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson began the Pass the Peace initiative in conjunction with Domestic Violence Awareness Month to help raise awareness and funds through his Why Not You Foundation. He is asking his friends and fans to #WNYPassthePeace and donate $2 to the National Domestic Violence Hotline, which has resulted in some famous faces responding to the challenge, including Kevin Durant, Mark Wahlberg, Bob Saget, and Derek Jeter. Fans are responding positively as well, joining with families and even pets to help promote the campaign. We were especially impressed by the students from Wahluke Junior High in Washington, who raised $1,000 and got the whole school to Pass the Peace. Want to join the challenge? Text WNYPASSTHEPEACE to 41444 or make a donation online, then challenge two friends to do the same!

Advocate’s Corner

Fans of Modern Family are probably familiar with actress Sarah Hyland, who plays oldest daughter Haley Dunphy on the television show. In September, Ms. Hyland filed a restraining order against her long-time partner after claiming he choked and verbally abused her. Now there are reports that she is doing well after leaving the relationship, and she is currently an advocate for pet adoption with the ASPCA.

Ms. Hyland’s experience mirrors much of what we hear about and discuss at loveisrespect:

  • She was in a long-term relationship, which from the outside may have appeared healthy and normal but was not what it seemed. Often abuse is hidden, as the abusive partner is extremely adept at gaining power and control over the victim and threatening them into silence. It can help for parents, teachers, and friends to recognize the signs that a young person may be in an abusive relationship.
  • When Ms. Hyland decided to leave the relationship, she called on friend and castmate Julie Bowen for support. Support systems are so important for victims and survivors as a source of validation and to help them stay safe.
  • We are big fans of self-care, and we often encourage those who contact us to focus on their own passions and interests, particularly in the wake of an abusive relationship or difficult breakup. Activities like joining a cause and helping others, including our animal friends, can be very therapeutic.

We are so glad Ms. Hyland was able to escape her abusive relationship, and we wish her the best on her journey to peace and safety!

Powerful Resources

While it’s difficult (if not impossible) to maintain complete privacy while having an online presence and engaging in social media, tools are available to help you manage what information is out there. If you or your teen is interested in regaining some privacy, check out justdelete.me. This is a growing directory of direct links on various sites, apps, and social media platforms to help you remove your online information. The site also ranks each outlet’s level of difficulty in removing information from Easy to Impossible.

 

If you have questions about healthy vs. unhealthy dating behaviors, or if you know a teen who might be in an abusive relationship, we are here to help! Call us at 1-866-331-9474, chat online at loveisrespect.org, or text “loveis” to 22522. 

 

September 2014

Welcome to September’s RespecText!

Know a parent or educator who would be interested in receiving our RespecText newsletter? Let them know they can subscribe just by texting “updateme” to 22522!

Tools for Teens

News Bits

  • The conversation around domestic violence and abuse has exploded over the past few weeks after the elevator footage of Ray Rice and his then-fiancee, Janay Palmer, was released on September 8th. It’s sparking some very difficult – but necessary – conversations with kids and teens about abuse and relationships. But what should you say to your child or student? CNN discusses ways to approach this situation and any situation that involves domestic violence.
  • September has been National Campus Safety Awareness Month, and on Twitter and Facebook we’ve been sharing links and information regarding campus safety (on Twitter check out the hashtag #NCSAM). Members of the loveisrespect team also attended an Interpersonal Violence Committee meeting with Voices Against Violence and BeVocal at the University of Texas at Austin. BeVocal is a campus-wide initiative that educates students about bystander intervention. Read more about the event on our blog!

Advocate’s Corner

On September 13th, loveisrespect attended the Texas Association of Student Councils Advisor’s Conference in San Marcos. Educators and student council sponsors from around the state gathered to share ideas about how to strengthen their student council programs and support their student leaders. Many teachers are seeing the effects of dating abuse in their schools and were excited to take our posters and palm cards back to their students. Some teachers took it a step further and attended our session on Empowering Students to Have Healthy Digital Relationships. In the session, teachers shared that some of their students are struggling to navigate the way their relationships play out on online, and they as teachers don’t feel that they have much a of a blueprint for how to best support them. They were excited to hear about the resources that loveisrespect has for teachers, and left feeling ready to have conversations with their students about setting digital boundaries and respecting each other’s digital selves.

Remember, we offer chat times just for educators and parents on the first Wednesday of every month from 1pm-3pm Central. Go to this page and click the Chat button next to “Are You a Teacher or Parent?” when it’s activated during that time.

Additional info on digital abuse from loveisrespect:
What is digital abuse?
Warning signs of digital abuse (video)
Texting and sexting

Powerful Resources

  • We hear a lot about talking to daughters about sexual violence, but boys should be included in the conversation, too. Here are 10 Tips for Talking to Sons about sexual violence.
  • According to the U.S. Department of Education, an unknown number of citizens and legal residents are trafficked for forced labor or sex in the U.S. every year, and cases have been reported in all 50 states. Children at risk for human trafficking can be in high school or as young as nine. If you’re a school teacher or counselor, it’s important to recognize and respond to signs of trafficking. This document from the National Center for Homeless Education is a useful tool for educators and school personnel.

 

Do you know a teen who might be in an abusive relationship? Do you have questions about healthy vs. unhealthy dating behaviors? Call 1-866-331-9474, chat online at loveisrespect.org, or text “loveis” to 22522 to speak with an advocate!

August 2014

Thanks for checking out the August edition of RespecText!

Do you know a parent, teacher, or school counselor who would find this newsletter useful? Help us spread the word and let them know it’s easy to sign up: just text “updateme” to 22522!

Tools for Teens

News Bits

  • September is National Campus Safety Awareness Month, and this year our theme is “Bystander Awareness.” We’ll be discussing how to be an active bystander when it comes to dating abuse and sexual assault, so be sure to visit our blog and follow us on Twitter and Facebook! Additionally, check out the Clery Center’s campaign for NCSAM, Know More, Do More: 30 Days of Professional Development, for a month-long focus on professional development around issues that affect campus safety at colleges and universities nationwide.
  • We’ve been talking a lot about Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, but this month we want to draw attention to another NFL player: Pittsburgh Steelers cornerback William Gay. Gay lost his mother in a murder-suicide when he was a young boy, and now he is an advocate against domestic violence. As he says, “Education is key to this and letting everybody know it’s real.” Highlighting positive role models like Gay and other professionals and celebrities who are part of the solution can show teens that taking a stand against abuse is something anyone can do.

Advocate’s Corner

It’s back to school time! Time for backpacks, books, bus rides – and talking about healthy relationships. A new school year often brings new relationships among teens, which can be both exciting and overwhelming. It’s never too early to talk about the basics of healthy relationships, and communication and boundaries are at the top of the list.

Do you have questions about talking to teens as they head into a new school year? Join our next TA chat! We’re available on the first Wednesday of every month to chat online about the topics that are important to you. Find us here on Wednesday, September 3rd, from 1pm-3pm Central – just click the “Chat” box when it’s activated.

Powerful Resources

  • The Asian and Pacific Islander Institute on Domestic Violence discusses strategies for engaging men and boys in the fight against gender violence. To create their fascinating report, Engaging Asian Men: Divesting from Gender Violence, Investing in Gender Equality, API Institute gathered advocates, activists and researchers addressing domestic and sexual violence, civil rights, LGBTQ rights, and gender equality to examine the complexities of analysis, strategy and community.
  • Looking for book recommendations on abuse, domestic violence, and relationships? Check out the National Domestic Violence Hotline’s Pinterest board!

 

Don’t forget, our advocates are available 24/7 via phone, chat, and text for anyone who has questions about healthy or unhealthy relationships among teens and young adults. Get in touch with us!

July 2014

Welcome to the July edition of RespecText!

Tools for Teens

News Bits

  • The National Youth Advisory Board held its annual retreat in North Carolina this month! Check out some highlights and the winning PSA from the trip on the loveisrespect blog.
  • Our partner Break the Cycle has teamed up with HopeLine from Verizon to promote the #VoicesHavePower Campaign, which was created to inspire greater awareness and participation in a nationwide effort to end dating and domestic violence. For every message of hope, Verizon is donating $3 to support its partner programs. Learn how to get involved here.

Advocate’s Corner

News and pop culture always give us plenty to talk about with teens!

You may have heard about Robin Thicke’s latest release, “Get Her Back,” and the controversial music video accompanying it (we commented on the song and video for MTV’s Act). Thicke’s latest album, Paula, is a tribute to his estranged wife Paula Patton and attempts to reconcile with her through song lyrics, most of which appear to be fairly unhealthy to borderline abusive. Moments like this present a good opportunity to talk to teens about boundaries and respect, and discuss questions like, “Is this a healthy response to the situation? Where is the line between trying to repair a relationship and unhealthy behavior? If someone was doing this to you, how would you feel or respond?”

Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice was in the news again recently when we learned that he received a two game suspension from the NFL for domestic violence charges against his then-fiancee, Janay Palmer. Many people and organizations have expressed outrage at the NFL’s rather weak response, particularly considering that other players have received harsher punishments for using marijuana. This is part of a larger conversation about how much of our society doesn’t always take domestic violence seriously and/or grossly misunderstands the dynamics of abuse. As this case goes on, and as other cases like it continue to occur, it’s a good idea to be talking to teens about the importance of respect, accountability, and being critical of what they see in the media.

Powerful Resources

  • In case you missed the recent webinar, “Insta-Decisions: Starting the Conversation with Teens About Explicit Pics and Social Media Safety,” presented by loveisrespect and National Latin@ Network, you can download it from the archives. This webinar will also be presented in Spanish on Wednesday, July 30th.
  • This video has been around for a while, but if you haven’t seen it, it’s a great primer on the difference between being concerned and being controlling in a relationship.
  • This video lets the viewer make the choice of whether or not to sext with a partner. We do agree with the powerful message that once you send something via text or any type of device, that information is no longer under your control. However, the video leaves out the importance of discussing respect, trust, and boundaries within relationships. It’s a good idea to reiterate to teens that they have ultimate control over their own bodies, and they never have to do anything – whether in the physical or digital world – that they aren’t comfortable with.

Plus, don’t forget to check out the loveisrespect Tumblr and our new Pinterest board for more links, ideas, and information!

 

If you or a teen you know has questions about healthy vs. unhealthy dating relationships, get in touch with one of our advocates by calling 1-866-331-9474, chatting online at loveisrespect.org, or texting “loveis” to 22522.

June 2014

Welcome to the June edition of RespecText!

Tools for Teens

We’ve been discussing a lot of big topics on our blog over the past month:

News Bits

What’s going on with the loveisrespect team?

  • Our partner organization Break the Cycle asked Oklahoma to Start Talking. Next up: Texas!
  • Black Girls CODE is teaming up with Verizon Hopeline and Break The Cycle to deliver a series of hackathons this summer with the theme loveisrespect. Girls between the ages of 12 – 17 are invited to attend the all-girls hackathon to build their skills and experience with app development. The next hackathon is coming up in New Orleans on July 2nd & 3rd. If you’re the parent or guardian of a girl who is interested in technology, mobile and games, learn more about this event and how to get involved!

What’s going on around the country?

  • Several senators are introducing legislation calling for stronger restrictions on gun access for people with a history of abusive behavior. Among many notable updates to gun laws, they are asking to expand protections to include victims of dating violence. Read more about the issue and the National Domestic Violence Hotline’s 8-week focus study on the use of firearms in domestic violence situations on the Hotline blog.
  • Brad Ausmus, manager of the Detroit Tigers, recently made a rather unfunny “joke” about domestic violence while speaking to the press. Many people might dismiss these types of jokes as no big deal, but as we’ve said before, making jokes about domestic violence only minimizes the issue and makes it more difficult for victims to be taken seriously. Mike Bates, a columnist at SBNation.com, wrote a very reasoned response to Ausmus’s remark. This is an opportunity for coaches of young men and women to talk about how important it is to own up to our mistakes, and why what we say carries so much weight. As Bates writes, “it’s an indictment of our culture, which so readily thinks of ways to make the beating of women into a quip that seems to land so well in Ausmus’s press conference.”
  • Rolling Stone published an excellent run-down of how policies around campus sexual assault are changing and what that means for college campuses. As high school students are graduating and heading off to college in the fall, now is a good time to familiarize yourself with the issue and talk to your teens about it, as well as what they can do to stay safe at school. It’s important to talk to both boys and girls about healthy consent, as well as drugs, alcohol, and abuse.

Advocate’s Corner

We have a couple of online events coming up, and we hope you’ll join us!

  • On July 24th at 3pm ET we are presenting a new webinar with the National Latin@ Network called,  “Insta-Decisions: Starting the Conversation with Teens about Explicit Pics and Social Media Safety.” Register here! Now that more than 60% of teens are using Instagram, a new window to ideas, products, and friendships has opened for them. Although access to social media can be incredibly positive, it also comes with exposure to unexpected risks for teens–including stalking, abuse, and exploitation. During this 1.5-hour webinar, we’ll explore how Instagram works, and how some teens and young adults are using it in potentially dangerous ways. Most importantly, parents, teachers, counselors, and anyone who works with young people, will leave with concrete strategies for opening up the conversation about healthy boundaries and safe social media use. We’ll include tips for harm reduction and information about what happens next. No knowledge of social media is required to attend. This webinar will be presented in Spanish on July 30th at 3pm ET.
  • Loveisrespect knows that parents and educators can play a crucial role in guiding teens toward building healthy relationships, so we’ve set aside a special chat time exclusively for you! It is available from 1-3pm CST on the first Wednesday of every month. If you have any questions about how to support the teens in your lives, join us on July 2nd by clicking on the TA chat button when it’s activated!

Powerful Resources

End Rape on Campus, one of the organizations mentioned in the Rolling Stone article above, is able to assist with campus sexual assault cases and provides information on both Title IX and the Clery Act.

 

Did you find this edition of RespecText helpful? Help us spread the word! Let parents and teachers in your community know they can subscribe by texting “updateme” to 22522 for monthly tips and information.